Analyst Opinion

IoT

"Over the past twelve months, all of the major industrial IoT platforms have worked to make at least some of their industry- or IoT-specific capabilities available through hyperscale cloud providers including AWS, IBM, and Microsoft. As these hyperscale clouds extend their geographic reach, acquire further evidence for compliance with strict regulatory environments, and strengthen their own IoT capabilities, this trend will accelerate.

Today, IoT-enabled business processes primarily occur in on-premises data centers or in the cloud. In 2018, we will see significant momentum among firms deploying business processes requiring local data analysis close to the connected devices that enable these processes. The edge IoT devices can act locally based on data they generate, as well as take advantage of the cloud for security, scalability, configuration, deployment, and management.

Today, IoT-enabled business processes primarily occur in on-premises data centers or in the cloud. In 2018, we will see significant momentum among firms deploying business processes requiring local data analysis close to the connected devices that enable these processes. The edge IoT devices can act locally based on data they generate, as well as take advantage of the cloud for security, scalability, configuration, deployment, and management."

by Gill Press

"IoT is likely to become more specialized in the coming year, moving away from generic hardware and software into platforms designed for specific industries. So-called “design and operate’ scenarios” will let IoT developers focus on the attributes that matter most to their own industries and use cases.

That makes sense because as the IoT industry continues to grow, you won’t need to be generic to achieve economies of scale. And IoT customers don’t want the hassle of adapting generic products to their particular needs.

Sure, plenty of enterprises will run and manage their IoT implementations out of their own data centers. But more and more of IoT connectivity and integrations may happen in the cloud."

by Pete Harris

"In 2017, the number of IoT platforms surged to more than 450. IoT platform revenue increased 116 percent in 2017. It is likely, however, in the coming year, some of the smaller IoT platforms will begin to fall away or merge with rival platforms. This trend will likely be similar to the search engine market in the 1990s. The market doesn’t need hundreds of specialized platforms that are nevertheless similar in function.

It is doubtful the IoT platform market will consolidate to anywhere close to the extent of the search engine market given the wide variation of IoT deployments across a diverse set of industries, ranging from aviation to healthcare.

Successful platforms will tend to be generic for IoT deployments from large tech vendors that support custom deployments. There also will be a vital role for specialized IoT platform vendors targeting niche industries."

by Brian Buntz

"Like in the early days of the Internet, IoT is a greenfield market. New players, with new business models, approaches, and solutions can appear out of nowhere and overtake incumbents.

While there is lots of talk about wearables and connected homes, the real value and immediate market for IoT is with businesses and enterprises. The adoption of IoT will be much more like the traditional IT diffusion model (businesses to consumers) than the Consumer-led adoption of social media and personal mobility.

The currency of IoT will be “data”. But, this new currency only has value if the masses of data can be translated into insights and information which can be converted into concrete actions that will transform businesses, change people’s lives and effect social change."

by Stuart Taylor